The IMRC is thrilled to host the 2017 Digital Humanities week, starting today!  You can read more about the event and view the entire schedule of events here:  http://digitalhumanitiesweek.org/

This year’s event is themed on the “STEM to STEAM” movement, with a special keynote address from Roger Malina, the Executive Editor at Leonardo press and Faculty at the University of Texas Dallas.

Here’s a list of some of the many events taking place throughout the week

Anyone interested in improving the diversity of students in computing fields–especially training women coders at the undergraduate level–should check out the 1pm Monday workshop on gender and code at the IMRC. It features COS/NMD alumna Ruth Leopold, who worked with Silvia, Mike Scott, and me last year to develop a peer-to-peer network for supporting women learning to program in our courses. Ruth’s research suggests approaches that technically minded professors can steal from the arts to teach programming in a more inclusive and engaging way.
Folks with an interest in bioengineering and information science will want to meet Joe Davis, MIT’s unofficial artist-in-residence. Davis has built a fishing rig for paramecia, beamed images to the stars, and stored data in DNA two decades before George Church of Harvard announced the discovery (to his credit, Church later acknowledged that Davis had gotten there first). Davis is speaking Tuesday at 3:30 in the IMRC and conducts a workshop on DIY Scientific instruments Wednesday at 3:30 in the Hackerspace at the Union.
You Spatial folks, meanwhile, should check out Todd Presner’s talk on “hypercities”– layers of urban information superimposed on city maps. That’s Monday at 3:10pm in Hill Auditorium.
Roger Malina of MIT/University of Texas is one of the champions of STEAM–he’s giving the keynote on Tuesday at 5pm in the IMRC.
Nick and Rick Corey (cc’d) and their VEMI staff will want to take in some of the four events scheduled Monday through Wednesday that relate to audiovisual immersion, from how to create animations for planetarium domes to how to spatialize sound for public environments. Charlie Murrow, the guy focusing on immersive sound, is renowned for his custom software that places sound sources above and below the horizon to bathe the listener in 3d audio.
There’s lots more, and all 24 events are free and open to the public. You’ll find a schedule and more information at: